Young entrepreneurs work with cookies, cards for kids business fair

Siblings Poppy and Augie Erickson had very different ideas for the upcoming Children’s Business Fair in Winston-Salem. You could say it’s because of their age gap — Augie is 10 years old (although quick to note he’ll be 11 soon). Poppy is 6 years old. But their inspirations were similar, surrounded by family. Poppy was making thumbprint cookies with her grandmother and felt compelled to perfect the craft after getting some compliments. She also said she wanted her picky eater younger sister to try some of the unique flavors, like lemon curd and green pepper. That’s how she came up with her slogan: “Try something new.””Instead of just one color or one flavor, I decided to make the whole rainbow,” Poppy said. “Sometimes my sister doesn’t want to eat anything, even though she didn’t even try it. She is going to buy these cookies though. She already told me.”Augie’s first taste of entrepreneurship was like most kids — running a lemonade stand with his brother on a hot North Carolina day. “That kind of sparked my interest in creating a business and maybe making some money,” he recalled.He said he learned how to balance profit margins back then and took that into consideration in this next start-up: Ace of Spades. He’s selling decks of cards with instructions on three magic tricks. While he’s always had some interest in magic and getting reactions from people when he pulls off a successful trick, the idea stemmed from a school assignment on following instructions. Frustrated with the lack of clear results found online, Augie thinks his business will make magic feel more straightforward and accessible.”Cards are just an amazing and beautiful way to display magic,” he said. “I chose the simplest, easiest, most deceiving tricks.” Augie already has plans for his profits. He made his first phone call ever to the Ronald McDonald House to donate a quarter of the money he makes to their mission. Of course, that call led to his first-ever voicemail as well. But he said he eventually got in touch with someone there and has his donation drop off plans in the works.To see and support the Erickson siblings’ businesses, check out the Children’s Business Fair on Saturday, Feb. 26, at Kaleideum North on Hanes Mill Road. It runs from 10 am to 12 pm You can find more information at www.childrensbusinessfair.org/northcarolina-acton.This is part of a series by Jackie Pascale, children featuring around our region and their businesses leading up to the Children’s Business Fair on Feb. 26. Look out for her stories on weekday mornings on WXII from 5-7 am

Siblings Poppy and Augie Erickson had very different ideas for the upcoming Children’s Business Fair in Winston-Salem.

You could say it’s because of their age gap — Augie is 10 years old (although quick to note he’ll be 11 soon). Poppy is 6 years old. But their inspirations were similar, surrounded by family.

Poppy was making thumbprint cookies with her grandmother and felt compelled to perfect the craft after getting some compliments. She also said she wanted her picky eater younger sister to try some of the unique flavors, like lemon curd and green pepper. That’s how she came up with her slogan: “Try something new.”

“Instead of just one color or one flavor, I decided to make the whole rainbow,” Poppy said. “Sometimes my sister doesn’t want to eat anything, even though she didn’t even try it. She is going to buy these cookies though. She already told me.”

Augie’s first taste of entrepreneurship was like most kids — running a lemonade stand with his brother on a hot North Carolina day.

“That kind of sparked my interest in creating a business and maybe making some money,” he recalled.

He said he learned how to balance profit margins back then and took that into consideration in this next start-up: Ace of Spades. He’s selling decks of cards with instructions on three magic tricks.

While he’s always had some interest in magic and getting reactions from people when he pulls off a successful trick, the idea stemmed from a school assignment on following instructions. Frustrated with the lack of clear results found online, Augie thinks his business will make magic feel more straightforward and accessible.

“Cards are just an amazing and beautiful way to display magic,” he said. “I chose the simplest, easiest, most deceiving tricks.”

Augie already has plans for his profits. He made his first phone call ever to the Ronald McDonald House to donate a quarter of the money he makes to their mission. Of course, that call led to his first-ever voicemail as well. But he said he eventually got in touch with someone there and has his donation drop off plans in the works.

To see and support the Erickson siblings’ businesses, check out the Children’s Business Fair on Saturday, Feb. 26, at Kaleideum North on Hanes Mill Road. It runs from 10 am to 12 pm You can find more information at www.childrensbusinessfair.org/northcarolina-acton.

This is part of a series by Jackie Pascale, featuring children around our region and their businesses leading up to the Children’s Business Fair on Feb. 26. Look out for her stories on weekday mornings on WXII from 5-7 am

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